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Mark, Peter, and Isaiah 53: Prophecy Fulfilled…By Us?

In the previous two posts on Mark’s Gospel we took a look at the Messianic Secret (here) as well as discipleship (here) and how both relate to a major theme in Mark—the suffering of the Messiah. I’d like to wrap up this short series by using Mark as a springboard outward to broaden our view of the topic of suffering. To do this we have to realize something about Mark’s Gospel. It gains apostolic authority and a stamp of approval because of Mark’s relationship with Peter. In many ways Mark can be considered Peter’s Gospel. While Peter obviously didn’t write it, it’s likely that it was heavily influenced by him. Taylor points out:

Walking Trees? Is this Mark’s Gospel or Tolkien?

At the very heart of Mark’s Gospel both structurally and theologically are two events that take place in 8:22-30. Each one includes the messianic secret theme (for more on the messianic secret read my post here) and together they act as the hinge upon which the entire message of Mark turns. Up to this point in the Gospel, Mark has focused primarily on Yeshua’s interactions with the crowds through a “twofold sequence of feeding miracles, sea crossings, conflicts with the Pharisees, conversations about bread, [and] healings.”[1] Beyond this portion Mark begins to zero in on Yeshua’s interactions with his disciples and his impending sacrifice.[2]